Archives for posts with tag: dog

Warning! Cocoa Mulch from Target is toxic to dogs and cats!!
http://midwestdogblog.tumblr.com/post/50960136050/please-tell-every-dog-or-cat-owner-you-know-even

Cocoa Shell Mulch sold at target is toxic to dogs and cats

Cocoa Shell Mulch sold at target is toxic to dogs and cats

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I wanted to bring some attention to a rare cancer in dogs because a client of Your Neighborhood Pet Sitter in Atlanta has been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer.  When the owner of Marley the Cocker Spaniel first contacted me to hire me as a pet sitter, she mentioned that she had just taken Marley in for testing.  Marley is only 7 and had been having trouble holding his pee and needing to pee more often.  This was atypical behavior for a very well behaved dog.  After she received the test results, she let me know that Marley had been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer and given six months to live.  In the meantime, we are helping out by being there for Marley on days when her owner has long days at work and giving her and her buddy Bocca as much love and care as we can.  Below are some early warning signs of prostate cancer in dogs.

posted courtsesy of PetWave.com, “Cancer of the prostate gland, also called prostatic neoplasia, is an uncommon but extremely serious disease that can affect both neutered and intact male dogs. Prostate tumors are aggressive, highly invasive, space-occupying masses that usually have spread to the spine, pelvis, lymph nodes, lungs and/or other remote locations by the time they are detected.  Symptoms of prostate cancer tend to develop gradually and include urination abnormalities, straining to defecate, constipation, scooting, bloody discharge from the penis, lameness, lethargy, appetite and weight loss, weakness and depression. Affected dogs can exhibit one, some, all or none of these symptoms. Owners who notice some of these symptoms should take their dog to a veterinarian as quickly as possible for diagnosis and treatment.”

DuffyWhen we visit Duffy in her home, we give her a dose of her asthma treatment.

Courtesy of petMD

The lower respiratory tract, or lower airways, includes the bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. The bronchi begin at the end of the trachea, where they split off into two branches. From there they split off into smaller branches, called the bronchioles. The alveoli are the terminal portion of the lower respiratory tract, within the lungs, where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place.

Bronchitis is the term used to denote inflammation of the bronchi and bronchioles. Chronic bronchitis is a long-standing inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. The condition of asthma includes both sudden (acute) and long-term (chronic) inflammation of the lower airways due to increased sensitivity to various stimuli, including allergens, narrowing of the airways, and an accumulation of specific cells – seen commonly in inflammation and allergic reactions – within these airways. In cats, both acute and chronic inflammation of the lower airways is denoted collectively as feline bronchitis, or feline bronchopulmonary disease (FBD). Chronic inflammation in the lower airways, if left untreated, may leads to fibrosis (excess fibrous tissue in the lungs) and lung atelectasis (a disease in which the lungs are not able to inflate). This disease can occur in cat of any age, but is most common between the ages of 2-8 years.

Symptoms and Types

Due to the acute and chronic nature of this disease, the following symptoms may be seen for variable period of time:

  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Difficulty breathing (some cats will breath with an open mouth)
  • Poor appetite
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Fast breathing with effort
  • Blue discoloration of skin and mucous membranes

Causes

  • The exact cause of bronchial inflammation is often unknown
  • Cigarette smoke, hair sprays, air fresheners, new furniture, and dusty cat litter may initiate an episode
  • Parasitic lung infections (lungworm) are also suspected

Diagnosis

Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam on your pet, taking into account the background history of symptoms and possible incidents that might have precipitated this condition. You will be asked about your cat’s diet, addition of new furniture into the home, and other related questions. An exact cause for this disease is not known, and finding the initiating factor is often a daunting task. Sometimes, something as simple as a new air-freshener is found to be responsible for a sudden episode of this disease, but often the exact cause will remain elusive. After a detailed physical examination has been conducted, treatment for acute cases is started immediately (see Treatment).

In the meantime, your veterinarian will take blood and urine samples for laboratory testing. These blood tests will help to establish the diagnosis, and also to characterize whether the problem is acute or chronic in nature. Fecal samples will also be taken for laboratory examination to see if parasites are present. Your veterinarian may also take samples for bacterial culture to see if infection is involved. X-ray imaging may help in diagnosing the nature, extent, and type of changes in the lung parenchyma (the functional parts of the lung) due to inflammation.

At some hospitals, specific allergy testing facilities are available to find which type of allergen is involved, if any. There are also some specific tests that can be used to take samples from the lungs, which can reveal detailed information about the disease.

Here is a YouTube Video showing treatment

Turkey Tips for Pet Owners from the ASPCA

Reprinted courtesy of ASPCA http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-care-tips/thanksgiving-safety-tips.aspx

Thanksgiving Safety Tips

‘Tis the season for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink.

Check out the following tips from ASPCA experts for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too.

Talkin’ Turkey 
If you decide to feed your pet a little nibble of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don’t offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria.

Sage Advice 
Sage can make your Thanksgiving stuffing taste delish, but it and many other herbs contain essential oils and resins that can cause gastrointestinal upset and central nervous system depression to pets if eaten in large quantities. Cats are especially sensitive to the effects of certain essential oils.

No Bread Dough 
Don’t spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him raw bread dough. According to ASPCA experts, when raw bread dough is ingested, an animal’s body heat causes the dough to rise in his stomach. As it expands, the pet may experience vomiting, severe abdominal pain and bloating, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring surgery.

Don’t Let Them Eat Cake 
If you’re baking up Thanksgiving cakes, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.

Too Much of a Good Thing 
A few small boneless pieces of cooked turkey, a taste of mashed potato or even a lick of pumpkin pie shouldn’t pose a problem. However, don’t allow your pets to overindulge, as they could wind up with a case of stomach upset, diarrhea or even worse—an inflammatory condition of the pancreas known as pancreatitis. In fact, it’s best keep pets on their regular diets during the holidays.

A Feast Fit for a Kong 
While the humans are chowing down, give your cat and dog their own little feast. Offer them Nylabones or made-for-pet chew bones. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of turkey, vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans) and dribbles of gravy—inside a Kong toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

ImageRead

A must Read and enjoy, the Huffington Post Reviews Seth Casteel’s new coffee table book “Underwater Dogs”.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/14/underwater-dog-photos-seth-casteel_n_1277404.html

 

 

We are so much enjoying daily walks with Crystal Monday through Friday.  Her “mom” has recently relocated to an Assisted Living Home in the Atlanta area due to her Parkinson’s disease.  Luckily this wonderful community allows people to bring their pets.  Crystal’s mom can’t always get out and about the way she wants so we come by and give her a long walk every day for fun and exercise.

visit http://www.yourneighborhoodpetsitter.com for more info.Image