Archives for posts with tag: norcross

This Tracker uses advanced GPS, an accelerometer, and wireless technology to help people locate and track the activities of their pets. Apps are available on your phone.

(Re-Print Courtesy of abc-news) http://www.pettracker.com/community/articles/abc-news

September 23rd, 2012

“Dogs now have the Tagg. Okay, well maybe humans now have the Tagg to track their dog’s fitness activity,” explains Joanna Stern from ABC News. Stern notes how Tagg—The Pet Tracker’s Activity Tracking feature captures a “24-hour view of the dog’s fitness activity” by using an accelerometer in the device which tracks the intensity and duration of the activity, from running to sleeping. Tagg’s Dudley Fetzer also provides commentary to this article, saying the feature “gives owners a way to engage with the product and is something you can also talk to your vet about.”

Your Neighborhood Pet sitter supports all products that protect your dog and increase the opportunity to recover a lost pet.  We offer daily dog walks and exercising in the Greater Atlanta area.  Give your pet a nice break while you are away working Monday through Friday. 

Key Search Words
Zip codes served in Georgia
30328  Sandy Springs
30338  Dunwoody
30350 Sandy Springs, Roswell
30075 Roswell
30076 Old Alabama Riverside
30346
Johns Creek, Marietta, Alpharetta, North Atlanta, NorcrossImage

 

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Turkey Tips for Pet Owners from the ASPCA

Reprinted courtesy of ASPCA http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-care-tips/thanksgiving-safety-tips.aspx

Thanksgiving Safety Tips

‘Tis the season for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink.

Check out the following tips from ASPCA experts for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too.

Talkin’ Turkey 
If you decide to feed your pet a little nibble of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don’t offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria.

Sage Advice 
Sage can make your Thanksgiving stuffing taste delish, but it and many other herbs contain essential oils and resins that can cause gastrointestinal upset and central nervous system depression to pets if eaten in large quantities. Cats are especially sensitive to the effects of certain essential oils.

No Bread Dough 
Don’t spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him raw bread dough. According to ASPCA experts, when raw bread dough is ingested, an animal’s body heat causes the dough to rise in his stomach. As it expands, the pet may experience vomiting, severe abdominal pain and bloating, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring surgery.

Don’t Let Them Eat Cake 
If you’re baking up Thanksgiving cakes, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.

Too Much of a Good Thing 
A few small boneless pieces of cooked turkey, a taste of mashed potato or even a lick of pumpkin pie shouldn’t pose a problem. However, don’t allow your pets to overindulge, as they could wind up with a case of stomach upset, diarrhea or even worse—an inflammatory condition of the pancreas known as pancreatitis. In fact, it’s best keep pets on their regular diets during the holidays.

A Feast Fit for a Kong 
While the humans are chowing down, give your cat and dog their own little feast. Offer them Nylabones or made-for-pet chew bones. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of turkey, vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans) and dribbles of gravy—inside a Kong toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

One of my weekly dog visits is with an adorable six month old German Shepard Chow rescue mix.  Her name is Addy and she is very bright.  Her “mom and dad” are first time adult puppy owners.  Recently they brought home a smart squirrel toy for their dog.  http://www.ihelppets.com/Products/Hideasquirrel.html.  Addy has taken to this game with amazing enthusiasm and concentration.  The game has three adorable squirrel toys that are hiding in a plush “squirrel tree”.  Addy’s job is to get the squirrels and remove them from the tree.  It is so much fun to play with her when I visit her for her daily pet sitting walks.  The puzzle solving dog game helps develop intelligence and keeps her young mind busy. She is challenged to focus on the task at hand and in the process fun, entertainment and bonding take place between humans and canines.

All animals can benefit from smart toys and smart play and you don’t have to spend money.  I know that every pet owner can relate to what I have experienced with my kitten, Jasper.  I buy a toy and bring it home, completely excited…and sadly she wants nothing to do with it.  Instead she wants to hang out on my vanity when I am primping and steal my hair scrunchies.  I have given in and now refer to one of my velour silver hair scrunchies as “her baby”.  I place the scrunchy on faucets, door handles and more and encourage her to find a way to remove it.  Which she does and proudly prances away with the pitifully stretched scrunchy dangling from her mouth.  Purina offers advice on their blog about puzzles and smart play.  http://www.petcentric.com/Read/Articles/Smart-Active-Cats.aspx?articleid=89c401d6-3362-432a-b475-3c3ae00e3f79

“In addition to the usual cat games, where you dangle a cat toy or pull something on a string, try some games that make her think. Dangle a favorite cat toy over a high surface, so she has to figure out how to get up there. Hide treats in places that are a little difficult to get to. Start simple, by placing one under a can or cup. Work your cat’s mind up to solving more complex problems such as getting a treat out of a small box with an easy-to-remove lid. Hide small treats in various places throughout your house.”

If you want to hire a sitter or pet trainer in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area, visit www.yourneighborhoodpetsitter.com

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