Archives for posts with tag: puppy training

This Tracker uses advanced GPS, an accelerometer, and wireless technology to help people locate and track the activities of their pets. Apps are available on your phone.

(Re-Print Courtesy of abc-news) http://www.pettracker.com/community/articles/abc-news

September 23rd, 2012

“Dogs now have the Tagg. Okay, well maybe humans now have the Tagg to track their dog’s fitness activity,” explains Joanna Stern from ABC News. Stern notes how Tagg—The Pet Tracker’s Activity Tracking feature captures a “24-hour view of the dog’s fitness activity” by using an accelerometer in the device which tracks the intensity and duration of the activity, from running to sleeping. Tagg’s Dudley Fetzer also provides commentary to this article, saying the feature “gives owners a way to engage with the product and is something you can also talk to your vet about.”

Your Neighborhood Pet sitter supports all products that protect your dog and increase the opportunity to recover a lost pet.  We offer daily dog walks and exercising in the Greater Atlanta area.  Give your pet a nice break while you are away working Monday through Friday. 

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30338  Dunwoody
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One of my weekly dog visits is with an adorable six month old German Shepard Chow rescue mix.  Her name is Addy and she is very bright.  Her “mom and dad” are first time adult puppy owners.  Recently they brought home a smart squirrel toy for their dog.  http://www.ihelppets.com/Products/Hideasquirrel.html.  Addy has taken to this game with amazing enthusiasm and concentration.  The game has three adorable squirrel toys that are hiding in a plush “squirrel tree”.  Addy’s job is to get the squirrels and remove them from the tree.  It is so much fun to play with her when I visit her for her daily pet sitting walks.  The puzzle solving dog game helps develop intelligence and keeps her young mind busy. She is challenged to focus on the task at hand and in the process fun, entertainment and bonding take place between humans and canines.

All animals can benefit from smart toys and smart play and you don’t have to spend money.  I know that every pet owner can relate to what I have experienced with my kitten, Jasper.  I buy a toy and bring it home, completely excited…and sadly she wants nothing to do with it.  Instead she wants to hang out on my vanity when I am primping and steal my hair scrunchies.  I have given in and now refer to one of my velour silver hair scrunchies as “her baby”.  I place the scrunchy on faucets, door handles and more and encourage her to find a way to remove it.  Which she does and proudly prances away with the pitifully stretched scrunchy dangling from her mouth.  Purina offers advice on their blog about puzzles and smart play.  http://www.petcentric.com/Read/Articles/Smart-Active-Cats.aspx?articleid=89c401d6-3362-432a-b475-3c3ae00e3f79

“In addition to the usual cat games, where you dangle a cat toy or pull something on a string, try some games that make her think. Dangle a favorite cat toy over a high surface, so she has to figure out how to get up there. Hide treats in places that are a little difficult to get to. Start simple, by placing one under a can or cup. Work your cat’s mind up to solving more complex problems such as getting a treat out of a small box with an easy-to-remove lid. Hide small treats in various places throughout your house.”

If you want to hire a sitter or pet trainer in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area, visit www.yourneighborhoodpetsitter.com

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My male long-haired chihuhua Nitro is constantly battling for Alpha position with my male Toy Poodle Tucker and sometimes with me. Here is some advice from dog breeders info.com regarding corrective techniques and habits.

“If your dog has a growling problem, here are some “rules to live by” that may be of help to you.

Never tolerate growling. This is a threat and it means your dog sees you as a subordinate meant to be dominated by him. Tell him “no!” Let him know it is not acceptable to EVER growl at you or your children. Make it clear that your children are the offspring of his alpha leader (you) and that they are to be treated as alpha “pups.”

2. Do not let your dog walk through the door first. If your dog always goes ahead of you, you need to get your leash and open the door. When he rushes ahead you pull him back and tell him, “no. Wait.” You walk in first and then give him permission to come in. This will be easier and faster if you have someone help you.

3. Do not let a dog that is having alpha issues sleep in the same bed as the humans. This is a definite alpha position. A doggie bed on the floor beside you is your best bet for maintaining alpha position. This rule is for aggressive dogs or dogs showing signs they are forgetting their place. A pet that is well-behaved and obedient can sleep next to you or your child, so long as it was the humans that invited the dog up. The dog should not be the one deciding to jump up on the bed. If you just can’t be without your dog in the bed, at the very least you need to make sure he sleeps at the foot of the bed and not on your pillow.

4. Socialize, socialize, socialize. I cannot stress enough the importance of introducing your dog to different places and people. Find something to do with your dog. Join an agility or obedience class. Take your dog to the park. If you have a laid-back dog or puppy, share your time with the local nursing home. Volunteer with disability groups so children and adults with special needs can enjoy the non-judgmental love a dog or puppy can provide.

5. Do not let your dog ride in your lap in the car; it is unsafe for you and your dog. Some states will give you a ticket for being a distracted driver. Make him sit in his own seat or on the floor. Buy him his own seat belt or safety booster or use a kennel.

6. Do not baby your dog too much. He needs to learn to be a dog. Do not over-protect him. He needs to explore and learn to be independent. You do not want to raise a flighty, paranoid dog. When he acts afraid of something that he should not be afraid of, do not pick him up and ooh and ahh over him. Simply tell him it is okay, and show him the object, person, etc. Your confidence will make him a confident and dependable dog. If you feed his imaginary fears, he will become a snappy and untrustworthy dog. He may develop fear aggression. An example of fear aggression could be a dog that sits in its owner’s lap and growls at people or other animals. If you pet him and tell him, “it’s okay,” you are really telling him this is the type of behavior you expect of him, and he will continue to do it because there is a reward attached to it. Tell him “no” and put him down off your lap. While some owners think it is sweet that their little lap dog is “protecting them,” this is not the case. When a child reaches to pet the dog or hug Grandma it could bite them if it is allowed to get away with this antisocial behavior. This is a dog that has taken on alpha position and you are a subordinate. I have seen so many children chastised when they get bitten, when it’s the owner that is responsible. You will often hear people say “Now, you know Granny’s dog doesn’t like you to go near her. She is jealous, and protective. We have told you over and over not to do that.” What a shame. And it could all be avoided if we would just take the time to learn canine behavior. As much as we would like to believe that they think like us, they do not.

If you have a problem with your dog growling at you or another family member, you may want to try having the person your dog growls at the most be the only one to feed him. You want to make him sit to reinforce your position as the leader. He is learning that he depends on you and he must obey in order to eat. And if he growls after you set down the food, tell him “no” and take the food away. Tell him to sit again. This is how you will reinforce the “no-growling rule.”

You must never tolerate growling because this will usually lead to biting. Not always, but it usually does. So you need to nip it in the bud as soon as possible. I want to make it clear we are not talking about puppy play growling, only growling that is geared towards aggression. Puppies need to be able to be puppies.”

Tucker and Nitro pictured when Nitro first joined the family.

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This is Teddy!  He is a baby and we are working with him to help him learn how to be house broken, love his crate and get out once a day while mom is at work.  He is still a very young puppy wanting to bite and chew on everything so we also work with him on proper puppy social skills.  Plus we love to hug and kiss him because, as you can see…he is adorable!Image